Precarious Work

“SENTRO is committed to fight for regular and decent jobs, an expanded ‘social wage’ – including public housing – and the recognition of labor and trade union rights for all workers in the public and private, formal and informal sectors.”

As an intern of SENTRO labour, we were tasked to do research work on Philippine Precarious Labour Situation. The project entails to do research on the incidence of precarious work among the labour sectors in the Philippines. Precarious work generally means poor wages, insecure employment, a lack of job protection for workers and difficulty for the latter to support their families. Employment should be considered precarious where features such as little or no job security, low and unsecured wages, a lack of social security (pensions, health insurance, unemployment benefit), no protection against dismissal, no vocational training, little or no health and safety at work and no trade union representation are present.

The members created a prototype survey form for data gathering. The second task is to pilot the survey form through interviews from various fast food chains workers and managers, and eventually a report to their office for further improvements and analysis.

Precarious work, of course, is not necessarily new or novel to the current era; it has existed since the launch of paid employment as a primary source of sustenance. Precarious work has far-reaching consequences that cut across many areas of concern to people. Creating insecurity for many people, it has pervasive consequences not only for the nature of work, workplaces, and people’s work experiences, but also for many non-work individual, social, and political outcomes. It is thus important that we understand the new workplace arrangements that generate precarious work and insecurity.

Cristobal Bamily 201263026

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